Samsung Tocco Lite in-depth review -

Look and feel

A handsome looking phone that feels great in both your hand and pocket.

Ease of Use

Although Samsung's TouchWiz UI is easy to get to grips with, the resistive touch-screen proved far more hit and miss.

Features

The Samsung Tocco Lite's affordable price tag is explained by its mid-tie features.

Performance

A host of shortcuts to a variety of social networks is diminished somewhat by the lack of 3G.

Battery life

A huge battery life, though regular use of the media player, Bluetooth and internet will reduce its timescale.

 Samsung Tocco Lite Review -
3

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:57:13 PM

6

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

6

out of 5

Ease of use

4

out of 5

Features

10

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

A sleek looking touch-screen device available for credit crunch busting price.

Cons:

The resistive touch-screen can prove a bit hit and miss; accidental commands were common place.

Samsung’s Tocco range has proved to be one of its most popular. Italian for ‘touch’, the original Tocco arrived on these shores in May 2008 and was followed one year later by the feature heavy Tocco Ultra Edition. However, it’s the baby of the three – the Tocco Lite – that has proved to be the biggest hit. Six months since going on sale it has already sold in excess of 10 million handsets (worldwide), making it Samsung’s most successful phone ever. We think it’s time to take a look and see what all the fuss is about.

Little brother

The Tocco Lite is much more akin to the original, rather than the Ultra, due to the fact that there is no 3x4 slide-out keypad and has a resistive rather than capacitive touch-screen. It’s also around the same size, making it extremely pocket-friendly. It feels great in the hand with a decent width and weight.

Samsung has included its now familiar TouchWiz user interface, complete with its pull out widget bar on the left-hand side of the screen. You can drag and drop any of these shortcuts onto any of the three home screens. There’s also a ‘More widgets’ widget that can be used to download additional ones from the likes of the BBC and CNN. Sitting on the home screen they are in effect RSS feeds, though you will have to refresh them manually to get the latest info.

Resistive touch-screen

The advantages of capacitive touch-screens over resistive ones have been talked to death. Bar the fact that you can’t wear gloves when using them, we’d opt for capacitive every time. This is demonstrated with the Tocco Lite. Attempt a featherlike scroll of the widget bar for example, and you’ll invariably open up one of the applications by mistake. The key is to leave your finger on the screen for a second before reverting to the scrolling motion. It’s not that the screen is badly calibrated; it just takes a bit of getting used to, especially if you’re more familiar with capacitive screens.

The touch-screen’s hit and miss results also apply when surfing the web. Hold your finger down on the display and the phone will switch to zooming mode. Then simply slide your finger up to zoom in or down to zoom out. It’s a slick mechanism, only again we found ourselves inadvertently zooming when we simply wanted to scroll.

Social networking credentials

With shortcuts to Facebook, MySpace and Flickr, along with lesser known sites such as Photobucket and Friendster all embedded, it’s evident that the Tocco Lite is very much geared towards the social networker. Photos and videos can be uploaded directly to any of these sites and coupled with the affordable price, the phone is sure to hit the right chord with the younger generation. However, for such a social networking centric device to lack 3G is surprising. A degree of patience is therefore required when waiting for the various sites to load.

The camera leaves a little to be desired, but it’s important to highlight that it does a job in that it captures those snaps on a night out that you can all laugh at when you post to Facebook. Beyond that: you’re not going to win any photography awards. The 3.15-megapixel snapper has no flash and we were hard pushed to tell any real difference between the scenery modes, particularly with the text mode that failed to sharpen the shot as it had promised.

Conclusion

This review may seem as though we didn’t like the Tocco Lite, but that simply isn’t the case. It’s easy to see why it has proved so popular, due to its sleek form factor, vibrant touch-screen and appealing price tag. Yet it doesn’t really excel at anything in particular; it’s a good all-rounder but very much mid-tier.

Danny Brogan
danny.brogan@nhmedia.co.uk