Samsung Jet Ultra Edition in-depth review -

Look and feel

The original was a good looking handset and with the additional silver trim and the sparkling AMOLED display the Jet Ultra remains a head turner.

Ease of use

The resistive touch-screen can be a tad frustrating, but the Samsung's TouchWiz UI is so familiar you should be up and running in no time.

Features

The Jet Ultra has the added benefit of BBC iPlayer and a better social networking integration.

Performance

BBC iPlayer streamed seamlessly and the AMOLED display continues to impress. We would however, have preferred the more finger friendly capacitive touch-screen.

Battery life

Presumably as a result of the inclusion of BBC iPlayer, the battery life has been dramatically reduced from the original.

 Samsung Jet Ultra Edition Review -
3

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:57:56 PM

6

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

6

out of 5

Ease of use

8

out of 5

Features

4

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

The addition of BBC iPlayer means you?ll be able to catch up with all your favourite programs while on the move.

Cons:

By beefing the phone up on the software front, the Samsung Jet Ultra Edition?s battery life has been rapidly compromised.

When the Samsung Jet first arrived on these shores, Samsung claimed it to be a genuine “iPhone killer”. It wasn’t, but with its electric processor, responsive touch-screen and beautiful AMOLED display it was no flop either. Having had something of a makeover its back as part of an O2 exclusive, and with a few tricks up its sleeve. Behold the Samsung Jet Ultra Edition.

Look and feel

Sporting the same dimensions and weight as the original, the Jet Ultra fits comfortably in the palm of your hand as well as your pocket. Though we’ve seen displays reach the four-inch barrier, with the HTC HD2 and more recently the Sony Ericsson Vivaz, the Jet Ultra’s 3.1-inch screen still caters for a decent viewing experience and the AMOLED display retains its vibrancy. Design wise and Samsung has made a couple of alterations, the main being the inclusion of a thin silver strip that borders the front fascia. Flip the phone over and there are no longer the ruby red streaks that adorned the original Jet, though if you catch the light at certain angles then there is still an element of red visible. The pleasing thing is that it remains an eye-catching device, perhaps even more so. However, it’s with the software that the Jet Ultra has had the biggest facelift. The fundamentals remain the same. The touch-screen is still of the resistive variety. If you’re a regular reader of our reviews, you’ll know that we favour the more sophisticated capacitive touch displays. While we cooed about the original Jet’s tactile display, a year is a long time in the mobile world and as such we feel the screen no longer has that wow factor, often frustrating us with its sluggishness. Yet there’s still plenty going for the Jet Ultra. Wi-Fi is still on board which is crucial to one of the Jet Ultra’s trump cards, the inclusion of BBC iPlayer.

BBC iPlayer

Comprising of a widget found in the familiar pull out shortcut bar on the left hand side of the display, BBC iPlayer enables you to catch up on TV and Radio shows you may have missed. Streaming the feed and we were impressed by the quality, providing a clear and sharp picture rivalling what you’d expect from your PC or laptop. The inclusion of a 3.5mm headset jack also means not only can you plug your own headphones into the device you’ll also be able to hook your phone up to a bigger screen with the aid of a TV out cable, though you’ll have to buy this separately.

Social networking

Samsung describes the Jet Ultra Edition as having integrated social networking. In truth it’s nothing more than three widgets providing shortcuts to Facebook, Twitter and MySpace, all of which can be placed on any one of the three home screens. When Tweeting, emailing (the Jet Ultra supports push email for both webmail and Microsoft Exchange) or texting, turn the phone on its side for a full QWERTY keyboard to appear. We found this greatly reduced the number of miss-hits we encountered when using the T9 keyboard in a vertical position.

Conclusion

To bring out a phone that only has one or two software improvements and a few tweaks to its design so long after the original seems a little strange, particularly as the underlying issues still remain. The inclusion of a capacitive touch-screen would have far outweighed the silver trim, and the fact there still remains no access to an application store will deter many. Ultimately the Jet Ultra seems a little tired, with the upgrades not enough to drag it into 2010.

 

Danny Brogan