Samsung Genio Slide in-depth review -

Look and feel

A sleek black chassis with vibrant changeable back covers aims the Genio Slide firmly at the youth market.

Ease of use

The resistive touch-screen is not as slick as the capacitive version on its predecessor, the Genio Touch, but the QWERTY keyboard is a welcome edition to this social networking device.

Features

In addition to the QWERTY keypad, the Genio Slide offers Wi-Fi and HSDPA data speeds for fast browsing, and A-GPS is a welcome but unusual feature in a phone at this price point.

Performance

The resistive touch-screen was disappointing, but the QWERTY keyboard was a real plus. A-GPS is a welcome feature, offering excellent value for money at this price point.

Battery life

Battery life was average, with 480 minutes’ talktime.

 Samsung Genio Slide Review -
4

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:57:19 PM

6

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

8

out of 5

Ease of use

8

out of 5

Features

6

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

The inclusion of both HSDPA and Wi-Fi will be a welcome addition for social networkers.

Cons:

The resistive touch-screen was not the fluid experience we had hoped for.

Samsung has caught on to a good thing with its Genio range – a touch-screen handset that looks good, offers great access to social networking sites and has an affordable price tag is going to appeal hugely to the youth market. Its first incarnation, the Genio Touch, has already proved a hit since going on sale in October. We had our reservations about the lack of 3G – especially as it was billed as a social networking phone and thus would require frequent internet access – but this oversight has been addressed with the Samsung Genio Slide. What’s more, it also has a finger-friendly, slide-out QWERTY keyboard and Wi-Fi, and yet remains ‘affordable’.

Youth appeal

The Genio Slide is marginally thicker than the original, due to the keyboard, but is still compact. Its polished black fascia is customisable with the bundled changeable back covers – another shout out to the younger target audience. While the Slide’s display has the same dimensions as the Touch – 2.8 inches – it is a resistive or pressure sensitive screen, rather than capacitive. Capacitive screens sense electrical impulses from your finger and tend to be more responsive and accurate, and this argument was supported when we used the Slide’s touch-screen. It just isn’t as fluid as the Touch, and when trying to scroll through pages, our pressure was often recognised as a key press and opened up an unwanted application. But we’re willing to forgive the resistive touch-screen, because, as a phone, the Slide far surpasses the Genio Touch.

QWERTY keyboard

Slide the QWERTY out and the screen will automatically rotate into landscape mode, with the widget bar staying put (although now it is located at the bottom of the screen). The keys are almost flat but they are large and differentiated enough to enable a fluid typing process. We were also pleased to find arrow keys in the bottom right-hand corner – these can be used to navigate around menus if you become tired of the cumbersome 
touch-screen – while two dedicated keys provide fast access to the web and messaging.

Internet wise, Samsung has kitted out the Genio Slide with Wi-Fi and HSDPA. It makes for a wonderfully breezy web experience and unlike the Genio Touch, you can now stream YouTube content without pixelation. Accessing your social networks is also far easier and, as with the Genio Touch, Facebook, Twitter and MySpace can all run in the background. To update your feeds you will need to click on the refresh button, but thanks to the faster internet speeds, you’ll be reading your friends’ latest updates in next to no time.

Another rare but welcome addition to a device at this price is the inclusion of A-GPS. If you purchase the phone on Vodafone, Telmap and Vodafone’s Find & Go service should be pre-embedded on the phone, though on our review sample it was unable to recognise our device. Regardless, Google Maps is also on the device for a full suite of sat nav features including getting directions and searching for nearby places of interest. Getting a GPS fix was fast, and the signal was steady, while a nice extra was being able to geo-tag our photos with the location we’d snapped them in.

Conclusion

With the Samsung Genio Touch, we felt it had potential but it didn’t quite reach it. That potential is realised in the Genio Slide. We have our reservations over the resistive touch-screen, but for a messaging device, the inclusion of a QWERTY keyboard is a real plus – as is Wi-Fi and HSDPA for the social networking aspects. With more Genio handsets due to arrive soon, it makes us very envious of kids today.


Danny Brogan
danny.brogan@nhmedia.co.uk