Nokia 6220 Classic in-depth review -

Look and feel

The design is a run-of-the-mill candybar, though it is a good size and feels tough enough to take the odd knock.

Features

As well as A-GPS, the 6220 Classic boasts 3.6Mbps HSDPA, a five-megapixel camera complete with xenon flash and expandable memory of up to 8GB.

Ease of use

As with most Symbian Series 60 smartphones it's a breeze to get to grips with, although we did find the keypad to be a tad creaky and thus a little unresponsive.

Performance

The camera complete with Carl Zeiss lens and xenon flash is a real bonus, particularly as the phone is billed as a navigation device. Thankfully that is excellent too with a fast accurate location fix and clear easy to use maps. Downloads are fast thanks to the HSDPA connectivity.

Battery life

A miserly 150 minutes talktime and only 250 hours standby.

 Nokia 6220 Classic Review -
4

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:52:53 PM

8

out of 10

Performance

6

out of 5

Look and feel

8

out of 5

Ease of use

8

out of 5

Features

4

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

An excellent feature set in a neat, compact chassis.

Cons:

The plastic keypad is both creaky and a little fiddly and the talktime is disappointing.

Nokia has done more than any other mobile manufacturer to put personal navigation on the map (if you'll excuse the pun). The company recognised several years ago that mobile phones were better suited for GPS assisted navigation when used out of the car than the dedicated dashboard-mounted sat-nav devices that have traditionally dominated the market.

 

As a result, the manufacturer put in place a strategy to fit the bulk of its new smartphones with a built-in GPS receiver and also launched a new Navigator range of phones that specialises in satellite-assisted navigation and location-based services.

Peculiarly, Nokia's new flagship navigation device is not the 6120 Navigator phone (which we'll be reviewing next month), but the new 6220 Classic which we're reviewing here and now.

It's worth pointing out that we're no strangers to the navigation experience on a Nokia phone as we've been using the GPS-enabled E71 every day for the past couple of months.

Nokia 6220 Classic - Personal navigation

As far as the navigation experience goes, the only real difference between the E71 and the 6220 Classic is the fact that the latter has a smaller screen and a GPS light on the side of the phone which blinks blue when the device is trying to establish a GPS connection and then remains on once one is established.

 

The Nokia 6220 Classic boasts Assisted GPS (A-GPS), which gives you a quicker fix courtesy of employing both a satellite and your network position. It also means that when setting up your A-GPS access point for the first time you will require a data connection.

 

You can check the strength of your satellite connection by going to Satellite Status, which is found by selecting Applications > GPS Data > Position > Options > Satellite Status. As well as showing how many satellites your device has found, when your device has a strong satellite signal the bar turns grey.

 

There's a dedicated navigation key on the left-hand side of the phone which takes you straight to Maps with a single click. When in Maps, as long as your phone has an A-GPS connection, you'll be able to see your current location as a glowing red blob on a map.

 

From here, you can search for local points of interest and plan journeys, either on foot or by car. Obviously, when you're driving, it's far more likely that you'll want information relating to petrol stations, parking, car repairs and rest areas, so these are the options you'll find under the Drive menu option. However, if you click Walk, you'll find useful options like sights, museums, ATMs, public transport and tourist information points.

 

It's very simple and pretty comprehensive, listing search results with the nearest first. However, you do need an online data connection for every search, so it makes sense to have a flat rate data plan if you plan to use the service a lot.

If you're planning a route, you're can either select a location on the map or search for a location by clicking Search > Addresses. We find the latter the most user friendly of the two options as the display isn't big enough to search for a specific address using the map. It would take a lot of scrolling left, right, up and down, especially if you're looking embark on a longer journey. The simplest and most accurate way to search for an address is to enter a postcode, then save it to Addresses or Favourites for future journeys.

Nokia 6220 Classic - Ease of use

The Nokia 6220 Classic is a Symbian Series 60 smartphone and it's very simple to get to grips with, especially if you've used a similar Nokia phone before. Unfortunately, the keypad isn't quite so user friendly. The keypad is constructed entirely of a rather creaky plastic and there's very little to delineate each key. As a result, the keypad feels unresponsive and it's all too easy to press a wrong key, especially. The smaller * and # keys are especially fiddly.

 

The only two raised keys on the handset are the menu key and the cancel key, which sit either side of the central joypad, and even they are too small for comfort.

 

Aside from the creaky keypad, the phone feels pretty solid and it's a good size for a monoblock handset. The back of the phone is made from a toughened, textured black plastic which gives you better grip and leaves no danger of greasy fingerprints.

Nokia 6220 Classic - The five-megapixel camera

Considering the 6220 Classic is being pitched as a navigation handset, the five-megapixel camera on board is a bonus and it comes with a top-quality Carl Zeiss lens and a Xenon flash.

To operate the camera, you simply slide the lens cover open and you can choose to hold the phone in one hand in portrait mode or two hands in landscape mode.

 

Controls on the camera are simple. The volume keys are used to zoom in and out of the photo and the active tool bar found on the right hand side of the display can be used to access the video camera or to set scene mode, flash, self-timer, sequence (burst/multi-shot) mode or to access the gallery. You also have the option of sending photos to an online album.

 

We're always impressed by the quality of Nokia's cameras and, true to form, the 6220 Classic provides excellent quality snaps and dedicated camera like control. For example, to focus on a subject, you simply hold the camera key halfway down. If the focus isn't locked, a red indicator light appears. To shut off the camera, you simply close the lens cover.

Nokia 6220 Classic - The verdict

In addition to the A-GPS functionality and the strong camera, the 6220 Classic provides 3.6Mbps HSDPA, so you can expect a swift web browsing experience not to mention nippy download times for video and music.

 

Enhancing the music player experience, there's a pre-installed application giving you direct access to the Nokia Music store. You also get 120MB of storage for music, photos and other multimedia, which can be bumped up to 8GB with the microSD card slot.

 

All in all, it's a good phone. Its creaky build lets it down a little, but the feature set is excellent.