Nokia 5730 XpressMusic in-depth review -

Look and feel

The Nokia 5730 XpressMusic is a chunky device due to the slide-out QWERTY keyboard. It looks similar to the N97, although it has a standard 3x4 keypad instead of a touch-screen.

Ease of use

We weren’t massive fans of the 3x4 keypad, though the QWERTY keypad was a whole different ball game – lovely to type on. As is expected with Nokias, the user interface is well laid out and easy to navigate.

Features

The Facebook widget on the homepage provides easy access to the social networking site, and the internet was super quick with HSDPA speeds. Marketed as a music phone, the 5730 also has excellent social networking and navigational features.

Performance

The Nokia 5730 performed excellently in terms of software, but the overall user experience was let down by the clumsiness of the hardware – the D-pad often led to mishaps that were highly irritating when playing games.

Battery life

Battery performance was average.

The verdict

The Nokia 5730 XpressMusic is a music phone and more – it will also appeal to those looking for a social networking or navigational aspect, too. It’s just a shame we didn’t like the hardware that goes with the internal features.

 Nokia 5730 XpressMusic Review -
3

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:56:17 PM

6

out of 10

Performance

4

out of 5

Look and feel

4

out of 5

Ease of use

6

out of 5

Features

6

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

Surfing the net proved to be a rapid affair while the inclusion of Wi-Fi on a mid-range device should be applauded.

Cons:

The front facing keypad and D-pad led to a frustrating user experience.

Nokia’s XpressMusic offering is a funny kettle of fish. What started very much as a music range has now branched into something much bigger. And the Nokia 5730 XpressMusic is the perfect example. Sure, the music credentials are in tow, but we would argue that this handset is aimed far more at the social networker than the disco shaker.

Spare tyre

Our first impressions of the Nokia 5730 XpressMusic was ‘cor, this is a bit of a chunky old thing.’ Its unexpected girth was soon explained though, when we realised the phone was hiding a full slide-out QWERTY keyboard. It’s akin to the Nokia N97 in terms of build, but reverts to a standard 3x4 keypad where the N97 instead had a large touch-screen. This keypad has been coated to give it a glazed look, which we found a little slippery. By contrast, the D-pad situated just above the keys was quite stiff, particularly when pushing it up or down.

Thankfully, the QWERTY keyboard is far more tactile. It’s completely flat, a style we tend to shy away from as we feel a bit of definition makes it easier to differentiate between the keys. However, the 5730’s keyboard was both roomy and required just the right amount of pressure to ensure an easy typing experience. Obviously, having a QWERTY keyboard is a major plus for heavy texters and emailers and with a Facebook widget embedded in the device along with Nokia’s own Ovi service, it’s perfect for the social networker. While Facebook isn’t integrated like it is on the N97, it’s useful having the aforementioned widget that enables near instant access – due in part to the lightening quick HSDPA data speeds. Bizarrely, while the text appeared somewhat pixelated, the picture quality was excellent. We say ‘bizarre’ because the opposite is far more common.

Ovi

Ovi, on the other hand, is fully integrated in the 5730. Although initially announced back in 2007, it’s only now that Nokia’s Ovi store is really beginning to find its feet. Customers who sign up can enjoy unlimited storage space for photos and video, sync and back up calendar appointments and contacts, as well as display status updates, current location and what music you’re listening to. It obviously has its restrictions in that it is only available to Nokia users, but it achieves all it sets out to.

The Nokia 5730 also caters for the gamer with a host of demos to test from the N-Gage platform. However, we once again encountered some problems with the D-pad that often resulted in a wrong move, which when your seconds away from your third consecutive Tetris piece, can prove rather infuriating.

As part of the XpressMusic range, the 5730’s melodic credentials are in check, including a 3.5mm headset jack and dedicated control keys. While the 100MB storage is pitiful, Nokia has bundled in an 8GB memory card that can be side loaded in the device without having to switch it off.

Conclusion

Perhaps it’s worth remembering that the Nokia 5730 XpressMusic is a mid-range handset and as such, allowances such as the mediocre camera – it takes an age to fire up – should be made. Particularly as there is plenty going for the phone, notably the quick internet and an excellent mapping experience. That said, we can’t excuse the shoddy 3x4 keypad, irksome D-pad and general bulk that led to an overall poor user experience. Thankfully, it’s not often we have to say that about a Nokia handset.