Motorola KRZR K1 in-depth review -

Look and Feel

The MOTOKRZR was always going to be a gorgeous phone. A sleek clamshell with a glass-fronted veneer and soft paint finish at the back make it tactile and desirable, and the etched keypad is lovely. Perhaps a little feminine for some male tastes, though.

Features

A two-megapixel camera handles photographic duties and the MOTOKRZR also supports A2DP for wireless streaming music in stereo to compatible Bluetooth headphones or portable speakers. Bluetooth and 20MB of internal memory complete the set.

Ease of Use

Motorola's much-maligned user interface is getting better all the time, and a little time spent using it will convert most punters. The MOTOKRZR's camera, video recorder and music player are all basic, and all easy to use.

Performance

As you would expect from basic features, you get basic results. Photos taken on the MOTOKRZR are okay but not for printing, while music is better if listened to through Bluetooth headphones.

Battery Life

The MOTOKRZR has 300 minutes of talktime, which is not too shabby and means you can enjoy the sleek and shiny device for longer before refuelling.

 Motorola KRZR K1 Review -
4

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:49:45 PM

8

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

6

out of 5

Ease of use

6

out of 5

Features

8

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

It's a different take on the RAZR theme but this stylish design is still stunning, while the Motorola user interface has improved considerably.

Cons:

Despite packing two megapixels, its no-frills functionality may put off those who take their mobile photography seriously.

Motorola hit pay-dirt with the RAZR phone. It re-invented the mobile in ways that are still reverberating through the industry. The RAZR has already taken its place in the annals of iconic design and its enduring appeal is exemplified by the fact it's still going strong and selling well two years after its launch.

Clamshell phone

The MOTOKRZR isn't a radical departure but Motorola has given the look some much-needed pep. It takes the much-loved traits of the RAZR - the tactile, nickel-cut keypad and quality construction - but squashes the wide chassis into a more elongated frame, adding just 2mm in the process. It now measures a svelte 16mm.
The KRZR's new glass-coated front veneer is a move away from the RAZR's metallic armour. Motorola has also given the back cover a lick of soft paint and the whole phone is incredibly tactile. It also retains the RAZR's satisfying snapping clamshell flip action.

Etched keypad

The 176x220-pixel resolution screen feels small but its size limitations are dictated by the handset's slender bodywork. You won't need any introduction to the etched keypad because nothing has changed from the RAZR. It remains responsive and easy to operate.

Improved user interface

Motorola's user interface has long been renowned for being a nightmare to navigate but really this is a misleading description, often spread by people who don't have the patience to master anything new. Okay, it may not be as intuitive as Nokia's UI but Motorola has been working hard to make its wrongly accused interface more lucid.
The MOTOKRZR brings along these minor but welcome improvements: the number of clicks it takes to send a text has been reduced, while the choice of words that appear in predictive text mode now appear in the body copy for a more seamless approach; the search criteria when finding contact names is more accurate, taking you straight to the desired area, and the voice command operation is also enhanced. All these modifications will look to silence the dissenters and enhance the KRZR's reputation.

Two-megapixel camera

The MOTOKRZR's two-megapixel camera is kept simple. There's no auto-focus or any real ability to modify the exposure, and the lack of any flash hinders its performance in low light environments. But for a rudimentary point-and-shoot experience the KRZR does a sterling job and the pictures are good enough to archive on your PC or share via Bluetooth.
Video recording is similarly raw, shooting in a CIF (352x288 pixels) resolution at 15fps in MPEG format. The quality is disrupted by digital noise and judder and is only really good for MMS fun and frolics.

A2DP music player

The MOTOKRZR's A2DP (Advance Audio Distribution Profile) music player, like the 3G-enabled Motorola V3x, is also no-frills, so doesn't give you a lot of choice when enhancing the audio. But hook up your Bluetooth headphones and you can hear the increase in quality. The majority of A2DP headphones serve up driving bass and beef up your MP3, AAC or AAC+ files.
The 20MB of embedded memory won't be able to handle all the music, images and videos, so a microSD card slot is available to stockpile your clobber. 2GB cards are the maximum capacity but shop around and you could pick them up for around £50.