LG Viewty Snap GM360 in-depth review -

Look and feel

The Viewty Snap looks neat, stylish and posh. It feels good in the hand, although is pretty light – the only clue that this isn’t an expensive handset.

Ease of use

The resistive touch-screen needs firm pressure and sometimes takes time to respond.

Features

The three home screens provide plenty of versatility to find the things you need. But the lack of 3G and Wi-Fi means the excellent camera is held back by limited connectivity. It’s good to have social networking sites on board but again the lack of data speed reduces the effectiveness.

Performance

Again, the slow data speeds limit the phone’s performance. It’s certainly fine for making calls (which is a start) though texting isn’t easy on the small screen.

Battery life

Good battery life means you won’t have to recharge the phone every day.

 LG Viewty Snap GM360 Review -
2

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:58:45 PM

4

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

6

out of 5

Ease of use

4

out of 5

Features

6

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

Good camera with strong features. Neat styling.

Cons:

No Wi-Fi or 3G. Unresponsive touch-screen.

LG’s gift, it seems, is to make phones that look much smarter than their price suggests. So it is with the GM360, which has an elegant styling, a touch-screen with three discreet buttons beneath (to send and end calls or launch favourite apps) and a gloss black casing with gleaming chrome curved top and bottom edges. It looks pretty classy and feels good, too, even if it is a little on the light side.

As with other phones that have sought to keep the price down, there are some notable omissions, such as the lack of 3G and Wi-Fi. The fact that neither is on-board the LG Viewty helps keep the size of the phone down, too.

Snap happy

One area where LG hasn’t scrimped though is with the Viewty’s camera. Of course, as it’s the latest in the Viewty range of cameraphones you’d expect nothing less. The five-megapixel camera comes complete with an Schneider-Kreuznach lens, auto-focus and an LED flash. There’s also the range of photographic extras you’d expect on an LG cameraphone such as macro for close-ups, continuous shot for three, six or nine consecutive snaps, night mode and so on. The three-inch touch-screen is great for viewing shots as you take them or to play them back.

 

Quite a sophisticated camera, then, which makes you question the absence of 3G and Wi-Fi. After all, to send the high quality images via SMS means they have to be brutally resized. You can send them by email but at GPRS speeds, this will take some time. Alternatively, you can send your snaps via Bluetooth but obviously this means you’ll need to be close to the computer you’re sending it to.


Overall, it’s disappointing that there’s no faster long-range data capability to move photos around at full resolution. The slow data of GPRS means that surfing the internet is a sluggish experience at best – and that three-inch screen means you’re more likely to want to be on the net on this phone.

The display is a resistive touch-screen – no surprise as this is a price-conscious handset - so requires pressure to elicit a response. This is usually no problem, though to wake the phone from sleep you have to swipe your finger up the screen and it sometimes took a couple of times to register.

Nice gesture

Incidentally, you can assign gesture shapes to certain programs so instead of swiping up the screen you can, say, draw a triangle to go straight to text messages. This is a handy time saver and works very well. If you forget what gesture launches which program, drawing a question mark takes you to a screen with all the details.

Like the LG Town the Viewty Snap has three home screens, including the Live Square screen that compiles calls, messages and so on to build a screen with cartoon versions of friends. The third is for regular contacts, and you can paste shortcuts to favourites on screen. Again, this element is on the LG Town.

The first screen also houses shortcuts to favourite apps, such as Facebook. It would have been useful to have a way to send photos direct to Facebook from the photo application, but instead you have to launch Facebook and use the app's upload feature.

Texting isn’t the best – hold the phone upright and you get a regular 1-9 keypad. Tip it on its side and there’s a full QWERTY, but it’s pretty small and not so easy to use.

Verdict:

This is a neat, light handset that is fun to use until you get to data. The camera is decent, music playback is okay (there’s a 3.5mm headphone jack and expandable storage) and the phone works well for calls. But if you try to send one of the big images you’ve shot or surf the internet things take a turn for the worse. Disappointing.