LG OPTIMUS L7II DUAL in-depth review - The Optimum Optimus

Look and feel

LG hasn't broken any new ground with the LG 7 II. Its plastic back also looks cheap and feels oily in the hands, somewhat spoiling the decent front design.

 

Ease of Use

The large screen makes it easy to use, as the extra screen real estate makes typing and using apps a breeze.

 

Features

LG hasn't crammed in any bloatware, so features are typical compared with other Android phones in this price range.

 

Performance

The Optimus LG L7II has an eight-megapixel camera, which is good for this price range. 

 

Battery life

The battery will power you through a day and a bit with light to medium use, although that drops if you watch lots of videos and battery-heavy apps on the go. 

 LG OPTIMUS L7II DUAL Review - The Optimum Optimus
3.5

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,2/19/2014 11:14:58 AM

6

out of 10

Performance

7

out of 5

Look and feel

8

out of 5

Ease of use

6

out of 5

Features

7

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

Good size screen, easy to use, no bloatware, LED notifications

Cons:

Average camera, flimsy back case, feels oily in the hands

The LG L7II is the latest affordable Android model in the Optimus series; and the  South Korean phone maker has given it a bit of an upgrade compared to the original L7.

The L7II is lightweight and a good all-rounder, featuring an eight-megapixel camera. You now get a 1GHz-Dual-Core processor and a 2,460mAh battery, so it’s got plenty of juice to keep that 4.3-inch display shining bright. The handset comes with Jellybean 4.1.2, which is very responsive and easy to use. LG has not loaded any remarkable apps, so the whole experience is pretty standard and nothing unnecessary has been added to bloat the phone up.

Design-wise, the L7II looks eye catching and the sleek silver border really stands out. The LED home button even alerts you to different notifications by lighting up in different colours, which is useful if you're stuck in a meeting but are waiting for an important message.

The phone feels light in the hand, which makes it easy to carry, but it does lack quality and this quickly reminds you it’s a budget handset. The back of the phone also feels slick and a bit sweaty in the hands – overall, the build quality isn't the best, and we particularly noticed how flimsy the back case was when we removed it.

Wide Screen

The L7II is the largest of the four Optimus smartphones, measuring in at 121.1 x 66.6 x 10mm, making it a compact and practical handset. It has a fairly large screen size considering the price, measuring in at 4.3-inches, which stacks up nicely against the iPhone 5S and gives you plenty of room to use the on-screen keyboard. Unfortunately, the screen resolution is the same as the L5II, which is a bit of a let down, as the bigger screen could have done with a sharper resolution than 480 x 800. Thankfully, this low resolution is actually a minor issue, as you will only really notice it on videos and dark lit images.

LG similarly needs to work harder on making the LED home button notification useful. We found that when you receive a notification the screen would sometimes turn on as well, or the LED light didn’t stay on for long. If it had been better implemented, this could have been a really great battery-saving feature.

No Thanks For The Memory

The phone comes with 4GB of internal memory, but be aware that only 1.7GB is free to be filled by the user with apps, music, photos and videos (fear not, heavy memory users – you can insert an external SD memory card, boosting the memory up to 32GB). However, the L7 II only comes fitted with 768RAM so, unsurprisingly, the handset feels sluggish at times, especially when you have plenty of apps open and are trying to multitask.

The phone also insists on having screen swipe effects when in use, and we found that this really slowed down the response time. However, you can change the effect to ‘basic’, which removes the fancy animation, improving its reaction time.

Heavy phone users will be glad to hear that the L7 II has plenty of juice to last the whole day. When the phone is not in use, the battery will last up to 800 hours on standby, but a more realistic estimate is that light to medium use will see the phone last about one and a half days without charging. With a bigger screen you often get a faster drain in the battery, but during testing the phone performed admirably.

Shot star

LG has put an eight-megapixel camera on board the L7II, which is much better than many of the rival phones at this price point, and it takes clear, bright pictures with only a hint of graininess. A feature allows you to activate the front-facing camera so you can take those all-important selfies and while this secondary amera is only VGA, it’s more than adequate for video chatting on Skype. Those after no-frills snaps will be fine with the flash and picture modes, making this phone easy to use no matter what you decide to shoot.