Google Nexus 10 in-depth review -

Look and feel

The Google Nexus 10 sports a pleasingly slim and curvaceous body that’s both solid and weighty, with a rubber rear to help grip.

 

Ease of Use

Android 4.2 Jelly Bean is the most friendly and feature-packed version yet and it runs perfectly on the Google Nexus 10.

 

Features

The stand-out feature of the Google Nexus 10 has to be the incredibly crisp 10-inch screen, which packs in more pixels per inch than even Apple’s mighty iPad Retina screen. The capable cameras will please mobile photographers.

 

Performance

A dual-core processor, backed up by a mighty 2GB of RAM, makes the Google Nexus 10 a competent games and media machine.

 

Battery life

We streamed video for five and a half hours with the screen brightness turned up to maximum, an average result for a ten-inch tablet. However, the battery takes an age to charge.

 Google Nexus 10 Review -
4.5

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,1/21/2013 1:54:16 PM

8

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

9

out of 5

Ease of use

10

out of 5

Features

6

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

Amazing 1920p HD screen; Sleek, curvy finish; Capable and feature-packed camera; Multiple users supported

Cons:

Takes ages to charge; No memory card slot

Google’s Nexus 7 tablet was one of our favourite mobile devices of 2012, a fantastic value seven-inch tab that somehow manages to be powerful, portable and very well priced all at once.

 

Of course, not everyone is satisfied with seven inches, so Samsung and Google have collaborated to create the Nexus 10 tablet. This 10-inch Android device is a must for media fans with its sharp and eye-caressingly gorgeous screen, and only a couple of minor niggles detract from an otherwise perfect package.

 

Curvy and gorgeous

 

Picking up the Nexus 10 for the first time, our initial thoughts were how solid it feels. It’s impressively slender at a shade under 9mm, but packs a heft at 615g, about the same weight as Apple’s iPad. Your arm will start to ache if you clutch it one-handed for too long (unless you actually bother with stuff like going to the gym), but we found we could keep a strong grip thanks to the spacious bezel surrounding the screen and the soft-touch rear plate, which kept it from slipping out of our grasp.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

The front of the Nexus 10 is free of buttons because of Android’s on-screen shortcuts. Along the edges you’ll find the power button and volume rocker, as well as the Micro USB and HDMI ports for hooking up to your home computer or TV. The speakers are housed at the sides of the screen, so you get a powerful sound directed right at your face – easily strong enough to ditch the earphones when you’re snug on the sofa.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

Jelly Bean

 

Packing Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, the Nexus 10 tablet is a joy to use. You get a plentiful stack of widgets to liberally scatter over your desktops, tons of great features such as face unlock, and it’s all wrapped up in an attractive and responsive packaging that you can customise to your heart’s content. Our only issue was a couple of unexpected reboots when we first played with the tablet, but after updating Android to the latest version (4.2.1) – a quick and simple process kicked off from the settings menu – we didn’t see any more crashes.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

After upgrading the Nexus 10, we were able to set up multiple user profiles. This allows separate users to set up their own accounts and arrange their desktops however they like, thus avoiding the inevitable family arguments and tears when you find all your shortcuts have disappeared and your background’s changed to a One Direction wallpaper. It’s easy to swap between the different profiles, as it is on the Barnes & Noble Nook HD – simply head back to the lock screen and tap the one you want.

 

Super sharp

 

One of the big draws of the Nexus 10 tablet is the incredibly crisp 10-inch display. With its mighty 2560 x 1600 resolution, the PLS TFT screen is actually sharper than Apple’s iPad Retina panel (the Nexus 10 chalks up 300 pixels-per-inch compared to the iPad’s 264), and Samsung’s other excellent ten-inch tablet the Galaxy Note 10.1. Truth be told, we struggled to notice much difference in sharpness between the iPad and the Nexus 10 despite the greater resolution, but that still means the Nexus 10 has one of the best screens of any tablet right now. If you’re a fan of HD movies, get ready for your eyeballs to explode with happiness.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

Both films and photos are brought to life with rich colours, with only a slight loss of brightness and vibrancy as you tilt the display. The maximum brightness is enough to counter all but the harshest glare, so you won’t be squinting too much in sunlight either (unless you’re watching a dark movie).

 

Dual-core

 

We found the touchscreen was perfectly responsive to our prods and swipes, and over a decent Wi-Fi connection even photo-heavy websites loaded quickly. The 1.7GHz dual-core processor is backed up by a mega-generous 2GB of RAM, so the Nexus 10 has no trouble running apps either. We tried out some of the biggest Android games, which ran smoother than an oiled-up otter. Our model came with 32GB of built-in storage for apps, games and media, but there’s no memory card slot which is a particular drawback if you opt for the cheaper 16GB version.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

Battery life is about average for a ten-inch tablet: expect around five and a half hours of video playback from each charge, with the screen turned up to maximum brightness. Unfortunately the Nexus 10 takes a while to charge up again once the battery’s drained. If you use the tablet while it’s connected to the mains, it’ll say it’s charging but actually consumes power faster than it can store it, so you’ll have to leave it switched off to recharge. The same problem plagued Apple’s iPad (3rd and 4th generations). Bear this in mind if you’re after something for lengthy journeys or commutes, as smaller tablets such as the Nexus 7 by Asus and the Apple iPad Mini have a longer battery life and charge faster.

 

Fully featured 

 

The 5MP camera takes sharp photos the instant you hit the on-screen shutter button, and although wielding this tablet – or pretty much any tablet – isn’t an ideal way to capture a moment, it certainly works well if your smartphone’s camera is hopeless. We found the camera adjusted well to different lighting conditions and is bolstered by an LED flash for night shots.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

The Nexus 4 smartphone by LG has a fun ‘panorama’ mode, which allows you to capture a 360-degree snapshot of your current location, and the Nexus 10 tablet thankfully boasts the same feature. This is particularly great for grabbing a stunning landscape shot, as you can fit absolutely everything in. On top of that, you can shoot standard panoramas and HD video. A 1.9MP front-facing lens can also be used to chat on Skype or via Google+ Hangouts.

 

Google Nexus 10 tablet review

 

Conclusion

 

Google’s Nexus 10 tablet is a near-flawless blend of performance, friendliness and desirability. At just £319 for the 16GB model, it’s cheaper than Apple’s iPad but still boasts a majestically crisp screen that’s great for gaming, movies, web browsing and more. Of course there are more portable tablets out there, if you’re after something for the daily commute.

 

Chris Barraclough