Fly Mobile Fly SLT 100 in-depth review -

Look and feel

Available in a polished black or vibrant pink, the Fly SLT 100's sliding mechanism is both secure and smooth adding to the overall high standard of craftsmanship. The keypad is nicely spaced out with easy access to all the keys, which is a relief due to the touch-screen remaining largely redundant.

Ease of use

The SLT 100 boasts handwriting recognition that ultimately proves to be more a hindrance than a help. Navigating around the Fly is cinch, though the decision to only display three icons at a time in the menu screen makes for a lengthy experience.

Features

For a low-end handset the SLT 100 sports a cracking array of features, including a two-megapixel camera, complete with video camera and even a TV output cable. With a built-in MP3 player the highlight of the handset would have to be the handsets ability to record straight from the FM radio.

Performance

With no 3G, browsing the net is on the sluggish side, though its features, although basic, perform to the best of their ability. For a handset of this cost the overall performance of the SLT 100 is more than satisfactory.

Battery life

With only 150 minutes talktime and a mere 180 hours standby time, the battery life sadly betrays all that's good about the Fly SLT 100.

 Fly Mobile Fly SLT 100 Review -
3

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:51:26 PM

6

out of 10

Performance

8

out of 5

Look and feel

4

out of 5

Ease of use

4

out of 5

Features

4

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

Without spending a fortune, this prepay number has vast appeal. It's a solid performer for an attractive price.

Cons:

The poor battery life means you will be recharging far too often.

 

A dozen red roses, a posh meal, even a romantic weekend away; February can prove an expensive month, particularly if you're looking to spoil someone special this Valentine's Day. So, if you need to tighten the old purse strings, this tidy prepay handset from relative newcomer Fly may be just the ticket.


The SLT100 is a solid slider that boasts a smooth black finish (it's also available in pink) with metallic trimming. The slider mechanism is smooth and secure, and the build quality and craftsmanship is as appealing as the £49.99 price tag. However, the piéce de résistance - and this must be a first for such a low-cost handset - is the SLT100's touch-screen.

The Fly SLT 100's touch-screen

Accompanied by a stylus that is neatly tucked away in the top of the phone, the 240x320-pixel screen is responsive enough without having any haptic response (i.e. vibration when touched). Fly has even included handwriting recognition, although we found this function to be problematic in that only one letter could be recognised each time. Maybe it was something to do with our handwriting, but if the device failed to recognise a letter, it seemed always to default to ‘h'.


While the touch-screen boasts novelty value, particularly for such a low-end handset, the disappointing handwriting recognition tool meant that we found it too frustrating to use. Instead, we resorted to the more standard keypad and ‘wheel-key' - which is a bit misleading in that it doesn't actually turn.

While navigating around the SLT100 is straightforward enough, we found it unnecessarily tiresome. Once in the menu screen, Fly has opted to fill most of the screen with a magnified version of the icon you are resting on. As a result, you can only view three menu icons at any one time - seen at the bottom of the screen - which means you have to scroll through to find your designated icon, rather than have them all in front of you.

Two-megapixel snaps

While not great, the two-megapixel camera exceeds the standard VGA option you usually get with a handset at this price. Along with a flash and zoom, the SLT100 offers a number of shooting modes, including the burst option, which captures nine pictures in rapid succession.


Once you have taken a photo, you have to touch the screen on three separate occasions in order to view the image, which can prove a little frustrating. What's more, the screen feels jam-packed when in camera mode, with various icons cluttering the screen. The built-in video camera is a plus point, however, the maximum shooting length is only 60 seconds.


Using GPRS, surfing the internet can be sluggish, as can scrolling through a single webpage. However, thanks to the TV-out cable, you can hook up the SLT100 to a TV, which means you surf the web, watch videos or play games on a much larger screen.

Record from radio

The SLT100 houses an array of media features (though sadly no 3.5mm headphone jack) including an MP3 music player and FM radio, which boasts a rather neat application that allows you to record the radio with the touch of a button. The sound quality suffers somewhat, but we were rather taken with it.


It's unfair to compare a budget prepay handset like the SLT100 to more featured handsets which are only available on expensive contracts. However, Fly has produced a decent prepay handset that, thanks to a generous set of features for a phone of its class, is worth every penny of its appealing price tag.