Doro 338gsm in-depth review -

Look and feel

The Doro 338gsm features a garish white fascia and simplistic design, with only a numeric keypad and three speed dial keys below the screen.

Ease of use

The device is aimed at those who simply want a phone that makes calls, therefore it is one of the most straightforward handsets on the market today.

Features

Features are limited to a 50-entry phonebook and an alarm/panic button that sends a preset message to five specified contacts when pressed. It also automatically calls those five contacts in turn, until someone answers.

Performance

The Doro 338gsm delivers a good performance, albeit on the limited feature set, and it is also compatible with most hearing aids.

Battery life

Battery life was good; a docking station is also supplied that keeps the phone charged when plugged in.

The verdict

The Doro 338gsm is targeted towards the older generation and deliberately avoids unnecessary features. The panic button is a good idea, but anyone looking for more than just a phone that makes calls will be disappointed.

 Doro 338gsm Review -
2

Review by Sunetra Chakravati,12/12/2011 3:55:31 PM

4

out of 10

Performance

4

out of 5

Look and feel

8

out of 5

Ease of use

2

out of 5

Features

4

out of 5

Battery life

Pros:

Cons:

There’s certainly no missing the Doro 338gsm. Adorned with a garish white fascia, the handset is also on the long side. We assume both these factors are to reduce the chance of misplacing the phone. However, it’s the deafening ring volume that will leave you in no doubt on where you left it. Despite its length, the handset weighs in at just 99g.


The keys on the Doro 338gsm are large and well spaced, and the rubberised material means the keypad is a breeze to navigate. While the keys are large, the screen is tiny by contrast, so much so that menu icons are displayed individually and must be scrolled through one by one. It’s a throwback to when mobile phones first became common accessories. To access the menu hold down the dedicated key (found on the left-hand side of the phone) for at least three seconds.


Above the numeric, call and call end (this also doubles up as the back key), and scrolling keys are four smaller buttons. The furthest to the right accesses the phonebook, which stores up to 50 contacts – apparently you have fewer friends when you get to a certain age. Next to these are keys listed as ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ that act as shortcuts to three designated numbers. To store them simply type in the digits and then hold the selected key for a matter of seconds. You will then be prompted to key in the name of the contact. Talking of which, there is no T9 on the 338gsm (or the 345gsm), so don’t expect to be typing mammoth text messages.


Doro has included an emergency list that enables you to save five numbers, which will be alerted should you need urgent help. Once you have programmed these in, simply press the alarm/panic key on the back of the phone for around three seconds and all five numbers will be sent a text with a preset message. The Doro 338gsm will then call emergency number one automatically, moving on to contact number two if they don’t answer, then the third, fourth and fifth until someone picks up. While this is great in theory, if one of your contacts has voicemail (and let’s face it, that’s the majority of us) then that will count as an answered call. Not what you need should you find yourself at the bottom of a flight of stairs with a broken hip.


Compatible with most hearing aids, the Doro 338gsm also comes with a handsfree kit and a docking station that, when the phone is plugged in, will keep it charged.