First look: Apple's upcoming £14 bn UK headquarters in London

Samsung gave the UK a miss when it launched the Galaxy Note 5, LG did likewise with the V20 this year, but what Apple is doing shows that the UK is a big part of its plans for the future.

Apple's upcoming campus in Battersea Power Station redevelopment zone is being developed at a cost of a whopping $17 billion.

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At the moment, Apple owns a chain of offices which are scattered around London, housing as many as 1,400 employees. Once Apple moves to its new campus, it will serve as a hub for all employees working together without encountering the problems of distance.  “We are looking forward to opening Apple’s new London campus at The Battersea Power Station in 2021. 1,400 Apple employees from existing offices around London will relocate to this magnificent new development at one of London’s best known landmarks. It’s a great opportunity to have our entire team working and collaborating in one location while supporting the renovation of a neighbourhood rich with history,” said Apple to TechCrunch.

While the redevelopment zone in itself is a huge plot of land, Apple won't occupy all of it. As per reports, the Cupertino-based company will occupy around 40% of the available office space, or 500,000 square feet in total, which won't be as imposing as Apple's European headquarters in Ireland which hosts 5,500 employees and is set to add another 1,000 in the next two years. Nevertheless, the Battersea Power Station campus will still have the capacity to house around 3,000 people so it is possible that Apple may significantly raise head count in the coming years.

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The news comes not long after Apple gave its Regent Street store in London a significant facelift to make it more spacious and to flood the space with natural light. "“On Regent Street we preserved the incredible exterior façade while opening up the interior of the store to enhance the transparency and flood the space with natural light. By choosing materials sympathetic to the historic nature of the building, we’re able to modernize the space while remaining authentic to its surrounds,” said  Jonathan Ive, Apple’s chief design officer.

The Battersea Power Station redevelopment zone was a major coal power station before being decommissioned in 1983. The site is being redeveloped by a consortium of Malaysian investors and aside from the Apple campus, will also host residential apartments, leisure centres and shops, making it an ideal zone for those planning on relocating to somewhere convenient in London. The Business Insider has pasted a video in its website which shows how the redevelopment zone will look like once completed and at first look, it looks quite spacious, quite and beautiful to begin with. Do you think Apple's new headquarters in London will turn out to be a tourist spot or will it just disappear among high-rises and other buildings in the vicinity?

 

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