iPhone users targeted AGAIN by phishing scam

A large number of iPhone users in the UK have been at the receiving end of tricky text messages which ask them to enter their account details on a website to ensure that their iCloud accounts do not get deactivated.

Those who received such messages included star comedian Jack Dee and former England cricketer Matt Prior who promptly posted these texts on Twitter and asked other not to fall for the trap.

The messages were obviously not sent by Apple and the smartphone giant confirmed the same on its website. However, those who sent such targeted text messages used the full names of the recipients in the text messages to give an impression that the messages were authentic.




""Phishers" create elaborate websites that look similar to iTunes, but their sole purpose is to collect your account information. Often, a fake email will ask you to click on a link and visit one of these phishing websites to "update your account information," said Apple in its website.

"In general, all account-related activities will take place in the iTunes application directly, not through a web browser. If you are asked to update your account information, make sure that you do so only in iTunes or on a legitimate page on Apple.com, such as the online Apple Store," it added.

The text messages in this case read:  "(First name, last name),  Your iCloud ID has been deactivated. To reactivate your account confirm your details here : http://icloudverify.uk - Apple"

Recently, Apple got caught up in a big storm when it was discovered that iPhones around the world crashed immediately after their dates were set to January 1, 1970. A number of hackers took advantage of this flaw and used the same to full effect. It was later found that when iPhones connected to hostile Wi-Fi networks, those who controlled the networks could crash such iPhones from their own (evil) NTP time server as iPhones have a tendency of drawing date and time settings from connected Wi-Fi networks.

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