Google kicks out 13 malicious apps from Play Store

Google has kicked out 13 malicious apps from its Play Store after a security researcher revealed that these apps copied device files into phone partitions that couldn't be corrected even after factory resets.

Chris Dehghanpoor, the research in question, identified these apps and found that they boasted huge download numbers on Google's Play Store and even put in positive comments about these apps without user permission. The thirteen apps he found are Cake Blast, Jump Planet, Honey Comb, Crazy Block, Crazy Jelly, Tiny Puzzle, Ninja Hook, Piggy Jump, Just Fire, Eat Bubble, Hit Planet, Cake Tower, and Drag Box.

How to step over the malware in Apple's App Store

As per him, these apps obtain unauthorized access to a device's root and then copy device files into partitions. The developers behind these apps come from the Brain Test malware family.

"It seems likely that over 2-3 months, the malware authors used different names, games, and techniques to see what app they could publish in Play while flying under the radar," he said.

iOS apps crash more than Android, claims study

The fact that apps are used as smokescreens to gain access to device files or to pour in malware is nothing new. Back in June, a team of six university researchers constructed malicious apps which were then fed to Apple's App Store and subsequently cleared the automated verification process to get published in App stores of iOS and Mac. These apps were weaponised enough to break through the keychain service that stored various credentials of Apple's in-house apps. Additional design flaws in Apple's cross-app resource sharing allowed these apps to even steal critical data from third party apps like Facebook, WeChat and Evernote.

Apple's iOS and OS X contain deep security flaws, say researchers

While both Apple App Store and Google Play Store can be invaded by malicious apps pretending to be something else, their effectiveness can be curbed only by how soon Apple and Google respond when they are tipped off by researchers and developers.

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