Five things you didn't know about Apple Pay

The fact that Apple Pay has now gone live in the UK is no secret, and existing Apple users must be itching for a test run. If you feel like migrating to the Apple ecosystem and purchasing the upcoming iPhone 6S and the stylish Apple Watch, here are a few things that you probably didn't know about Apple Pay.

 

Mother phones

At the time of launch, Apple Pay could be used only on iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3. However, after the Apple Watch was released, older iPhones like the 5, 5C and 5S could also be used for making NFC payments but only when paired with the Apple Watch which contained the NFC chip. This was a major respite for users of older iPhones.

 

Touch ID verification

Even though payments through Apple Pay take place through tokenization which prevents credit card numbers from leaking into the air, future iOS devices will be verifying payments exclusively through the Touch ID feature in iPhones and iPads.

Touch ID is a fingerprint recognition technology that is used by Apple in iPhone 5S and later versions.

 

Payment procedure

Once a payment is being processed, the customer's iPhone will automatically open the Passbook app where the customer can choose the credit card he wishes to pay from. The best part is that the vendor will know nothing about the credit card used except for the amount of the transaction.

Once a transaction is completed, a light vibration and a beep will let the customer know that transaction has been successful.

 

Online payments

As of now, you will be able to complete online transactons through Apple Pay only on apps which have adopted the Apple Pay API. Online vendors will be able to pull up customer details and shipping addresses from the stored credit card information.

 

Security

Apple maintains that Apple Pay is the most secure form of making payments and storing credit card information. Once a credit card number is saved on Passbook, it is assigned a Device Account Number which is separately saved on a chip inside iPhones. While making payments, the  Device Account Number is shared via NFC accompanied by a one-time dynamic security code to verify the transaction. Stored credit card information is also never uploaded on iCloud.

Apple's Device Account Numbers and dynamic security codes ensure that payments are completely verified and also ensure credit card information isn't compromised either through public sharing or via system hacks.

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