Microsoft has arrived at the Connected Home and Connected Devices party

Microsoft held its own Build Conference in San Francisco yesterday, unveiling a lot more about the much anticipated HoloLens and introducing a pioneering concept based on synchronization between Windows hones and tablets- the Continuum.

Continuum will let the new Windows 10 OS to mould itself in various forms, be it tablets, PCs or laptops if the Windows phone is connected to any of these devices.

As demonstrated by Joe Belfore, VP of Microsoft's Operating Systems Group in the Build conference, once the Windows phone was connected with a tablet, the PowerPoint app showed up in the tablet's screen and covered the entire area of the device without stretching any pixels. What's more, the tablet even displayed menus and every possible setting that featured in the mobile app, transforming it into a complete tablet app.

This is the first time any tech firm has ventured this far. Earlier, Motorola attempted a similar experience with laptops, but given Android was in its infancy and Motorola was yet to develop a complete smartphone ecosystem, the entire concept fizzed out sooner than it appeared. Continuum will, however, work effectively in dedicated Windows 10 phones only as Microsoft is in the process of developing a new processor technology with Qualcomm to make Continuum possible.

Current Windows phones which are upgradable to Windows 10 will also not be able to run Continuum in the near future. Developers will need to build new apps for Windows 10 that can mould themselves across form factors so that users can use them on platforms like PCs and tablets.

Hence, the success of the Continuum depends on how excited developers really are to commit their efforts on the Windows ecosystem at a time when iOS and Android platforms are increasingly dominating the smartphone space.

We should expect upcoming Lumia devices to sport the new feature later this year, hopefully with a lot of optimized apps that we use in our daily lives.

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