Focus on: Sony Ericsson W660i Walkman player

The whole Walkman music experience is seamless, right from the PC software, through to transferring your songs and finally listening on the fully-feature, superb sounding music player. Every aspect is covered when you get a Walkman phone and the W660i is no different.

 

This latest member settles for the second version of the Walkman music player and you can fire it up via the dedicated Walkman button or via the main menu. The graphic user-interface is slick with sub menus connected via family tree type links and these neatly slide into view when selected. Your stored music is sorted and accessed via the artist name, album title, by individual track and your playlists (these can be create don the fly).

 

Transferring your CD collection or existing digital library (it supports MP3, AAC, AAC+, eAAC+ and WMA formats) is carried out through Sony Ericsson's proprietary Disc2phone desktop software. It remains iTunes intuitive and easy to get to grips with and you hook up the phone to your PC via the supplied USB cable. The W660i also arrives with a bundled 512MB Memory Stick Micro which, providing you don't share the space with other multimedia clobber, can store around 125 MP3 tracks encoded at 128Kbps (more the AAC flavours). However, this means if you want the W660i to be your primary music player you will have to invest in a 4GB card to make it worthwhile.

 

The Walkman player doesn't just impress us with its ease-of-use but with its audio style too. As supplied headphones go, the in-ear bud headphones are cracking quality and you even get a 3.5mm headphone jack adapter to plug in your quality cans if Sony Ericsson's own aren't to your tastes.

 

Better still we hooked up a pair of MOTOROKR S9 Bluetooth headphones for a wireless workout and experienced a lively sound, especially with the five mode equaliser set to Mega Bass. Elsewhere in the music department, the W660i has a built-in FM radio and Sony Ericsson's proprietary music recognition software, TrackID, that can identify unknown songs simply but holding the phone up to the music source.

Written by Mobile Choice
Mobile Choice

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